Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

"Il n'y a en art, ni passé, ni futur. L'art qui n'est pas dans le présent ne sera jamais." (Pablo Picasso)
    0 0

    A Longquan celadon carved and moulded 'Dragon' dish, Late Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, 14th century

    Lot 3817. A Longquan celadon carved and moulded 'Dragon' dish, Late Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, 14th century, 14 in. (35.5 cm.) diam. Estimate HKD 150,000 - HKD 200,000Price realised HKD 400,000 © Christie's Images Ltd 2011

    Sturdily potted with shallow rounded sides rising to an everted rim, the center of the interior decorated in relief with a scaly four-clawed dragon leaping in pursuit of a 'flaming pearl', below scrolls carved in the well, the exterior carved with chrysanthemum petals, all under a glaze of sea-green colour, an unglazed circle on the base burnt orange in the firing, box.

    Provenance: Frank Caro Co., New York, 21 May 1974. 

    NoteA number of these dishes with an upright dragon in pursuit of a 'flaming pearl' are known. Compare with a dish of this same size in the Sedgewick Collection, included in the Oriental Ceramic Society exhibition, Celadon Wares, October - December 1947, and illustrated in the Catalogue, pl. I, no. 40. Other related dishes are illustrated by R. Krahl, Chinese Ceramics in the Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul, vol. I, London, 1986, pp. 255-6, nos. 58-62; and a slightly smaller example from the Gordon Collection (34 cm. diam.) was sold at Christie's New York, 24 March 2011, lot 1134.  

    Christie'sImportant Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, 1 June 2011, Hong Kong, HKCEC Grand Hall


    0 0

    A Longquan celadon 'Dragon' dish, Yuan dynasty (1279-1368)

    Lot 3020.  A Longquan celadon 'Dragon' dish, Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), 13 1/4 in. (33.5 cm.) diam. Estimate HKD 250,000 - HKD 350,000Price realised HKD 275,000 © Christie's Images Ltd 2011

    The gently rounded sides flaring outward to a flat everted rim, moulded in the centre with a writhing scaly dragon, encircled by a freely carved foliage scroll around the cavetto, the exterior carved and moulded with lobed lotus petals radiating from the footring, covered overall with an olive-green glaze except for the footrim showing the biscuit burnt orange in the firing, box.

    NoteA dish of this type with a very similar dragon applied to the centre is illustrated in Krahl, Chinese Ceramics in the Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul, vol. I, p. 256, no. 62. Another almost identical dragon chasing a 'flaming pearl' from the British Museum is illustrated in Oriental Ceramics: The World's Great Collections, vol. 5, Tokyo, 1981, no. 132.

    'Dragon' dish, Yuan dynasty, circa 13th-14th century

    'Dragon' dishYuan dynasty, circa 13th-14th century, Longquan ware, Longquan region, Zhejiang province. Stoneware, porcelain-type, with carved and applied moulded decoration and celadon glaze. Diameter: 14.5 inches. Bequeathed by Henry Blackwall Harris, 1929,0722.5 © 2017 Trustees of the British Museum

    Christie'sImportant Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, 30 November 2011, Hong Kong


    0 0

    Serving dish with dragon and clouds, Yuan dynasty, about 1280–1320

    2

    Serving dish with dragon and clouds, Yuan dynasty, about 1280–1320, Longquan ware, Longquan region, Zhejiang province. Stoneware, porcelain-type, with carved and applied moulded decoration and celadon glaze. Height: 8,3 cm - Diameter: 38,1 cm. Sir David Percival Collection of Chinese Art, PDF A219 © 2017 Trustees of the British Museum

    The dish has a fine pale grey body and thick grey-green glaze. There is a foliage scroll incised and carved around the cavetto, a sprig-moulded four-clawed dragon pursuing flaming pearl among clouds in the centre of the interior, and lotus panels carved on the exterior. The foot rim is unglazed. 

    Potters working in the Longquan reign during the Yuan dynasty fired large numbers of these serving dishes. They were made in dragon kilns, so called as they followed the undulating contours of the hillsides. Longquan celadons were exported to the Middle East and Southeast Asia in great quantities. This dish has a prancing dragon applied in the centre and the outer walls are scored to evoke lotus petals before covering in a green glaze and firing.


    0 0

    A Longquan celadon carved and sprig moulded 'Dragon' dish, Ming dynasty, 14th century 

    Lot 4249. A Longquan celadon carved and sprig moulded 'Dragon' dish, Ming dynasty, 14th century; 13 5/8 in. (34.7 cm.) diam. Estimate HKD 350,000 - HKD 450,000Price realised HKD 325,000 © Christie's Images Ltd 2012

    The dish is sturdily potted with shallow rounded sides rising to an everted rim. The interior is decorated in relief with a scaly four-clawed dragon leaping in pursuit of a 'flaming pearl', surrounded by scrolls carved in the well. The exterior is carved with chrysanthemum petals. The dish is covered overall in a glaze of sea-green colour, except an unglazed circle on the base burnt orange in the firing, box.

    Note: A number of these dishes with an upright dragon in pursuit of a 'flaming pearl' are known. The earliest examples dated to the Song dynasty include one in the Sedgewick Collection which was exhibited at the Oriental Ceramic Society, London, Celadon Wares, 1947, Catalogue, pl. I, no. 40. Other related dishes are illustrated by J. Ayers and Krahl, Chinese Ceramics in the Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul, vol. I, London, 1986, pp. 255-6, nos. 58-62. An example showing similar scroll designs in the well from the Gordon Collection was sold at Christie's New York, 24 March 2011, lot 1134. Other examples were sold at Christie's Hong Kong, 1 June 2011, lot 3817 and 30 November 2011, lot 3020. 

    A Longquan celadon carved and moulded 'Dragon' dish, Yuan dynasty, 13th-14th century 

    A Longquan celadon carved and moulded 'Dragon' dish, Yuan dynasty, 13th-14th century, 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.) diam. Sold for USD 47,500 at Christie's New York, 24 March 2011, lot 1134. © Christie's Images Ltd 2011

    A Longquan celadon carved and moulded 'Dragon' dish, Late Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, 14th century

    A Longquan celadon carved and moulded 'Dragon' dish, Late Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, 14th century, 14 in. (35.5 cm.) diam. Sold for HKD 400,000 at Christie's Hong Kong, 1 June 2011, lot 3817 © Christie's Images Ltd 2011

    A Longquan celadon 'Dragon' dish, Yuan dynasty (1279-1368)

    A Longquan celadon 'Dragon' dish, Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), 13 1/4 in. (33.5 cm.) diam. Sold for HKD 275,000 at Christie's Hong Kong, 30 November 2011, lot 3020.  © Christie's Images Ltd 2011

    Christie's. Important Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, 30 May 2012, Hong Kong, HKCEC Grand Hall


    0 0

    A rare Longquan celadon moulded trumpet-necked baluster vase, Yuan-Ming dynasty, 14th century

    Lot 4244. A rare Longquan celadon moulded trumpet-necked baluster vase, Yuan-Ming dynasty, 14th century, 14 1/2 in. (37 cm.) high. Estimate HKD 250,000 - HKD 350,000Price realised HKD 225,000 © Christie's Images Ltd 2012

    The sturdily-potted body is decorated in relief with meandering stems bearing peony blossoms above a band of upright leaves. The neck rises to a trumpet mouth and moulded with raised bowstring bands. It is covered overall with an olive green glaze thinning to the carved extremities. The foot rim is burnt orange in the firing, Japanese wood box.

    NoteLongquan trumpet-neck vases with bowstring bands on the neck and upright leaves around the foot are relatively rare. An example with scrolling chrysanthemum on the body is illustrated in Mayuyama, Seventy Years, vol. 1, Tokyo, 1976, p. 166, fig. 482. Two vases with lotus designs are known, one from the shipwreck off Sinan and included in the Special Exhibition of Cultural Found off Sinan Coast, National Museum of Korea, Seoul, 1977, Catalogue, no. 23; another was sold at Sotheby's Hong Kong, 25 April 2004, lot 282. See also two other examples with a plain body, one was included in the Illustrated Catalogue of a Special Exhibition of Sung Porcelain, National Palace Museum, Taipei, 1978, Catalogue, p. 82, no. 65; the other was sold at Sotheby's Hong Kong, 15 November 1988, lot 111. 

    Christie's. Important Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, 30 May 2012, Hong Kong, HKCEC Grand Hall


    0 0

    A large Longquan celadon bowl, Yongle period (1402-1424)

    Lot 4247. A large Longquan celadon bowl, Yongle period (1402-1424), 11 1/4 in. (28.6 cm.) diam. Estimate HKD 150,000 - HKD 200,000Price realised HKD 225,000 © Christie's Images Ltd 2012

    The shallow bowl is thickly potted with rounded sides supported on a short tapering foot, carved to the interior with a large peony bloom within a foliate panel at the centre, and a wide band of undulating peony scroll on the well, the pattern repeated on the exterior. It is covered in an even celadon glaze of sea-green tone, with an unglazed ring on the base burnt orange in the firing, box.

    Christie's. Important Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, 30 May 2012, Hong Kong, HKCEC Grand Hall


    0 0

    7

    Roman Painter (?), Portrait of John III on horseback, around 1704. Oil on canvas© Warsaw, Royal Castle – Museum

    VIENNA.- The Polish king John III Sobieski (1629–1696) is inextricably linked to the history of Vienna. As the commander-in-chief of united armed forces, he liberated the city from the Ottoman siege that lasted several weeks in 1683. With this victory, he secured a place in world history and in the collective Austrian memory. Developed in cooperation with four major Polish residences, the exhibition at Prince Eugene’s Winter Palace offers the first opportunity in the German-speaking realm for visitors to become acquainted with the monarch as a private individual and to learn about his work as a statesman, an army general, and a patron of the arts and sciences. 

    Curators Maike Hohn (Belvedere) and Konrad Pyzel (Wilanów Palace) have traced Jan III. Sobieski’s life and work. With the help of almost one hundred paintings, precious objects, art objects, militaria, and memorabilia, visitors are given a comprehensive and lively picture of the Polish king and his time. 

    Belvedere General Director Stella Rollig emphasizes, ‘the exhibition John III Sobieski. A Polish King in Vienna offers the opportunity to get to know this important figure of European Baroque as a sovereign, a war hero, and as an individual. The wide-ranging presentation is owed to a comprehensive cooperation between Austria and Poland.’ 

    8

    Daniel Schultz the Younger, John III. Sobieski (1629–1696), Polish King, 1677-1680, National Museum in Warsaw © National Museum in Warsaw 

    Sobieski’s origins and his journey to the throne as an elected Polish king will be addressed in the first section of the exhibition. His abilities and successes as a military general were, above all, what earned him the Polish crown. By the age of twenty, Sobieski had already stood his first time on the battlefield. The 1673 triumph of the Polish-Lithuanian army at Chocim (Khotyn) over Ottoman troops and the simultaneous death of the reigning king galvanized his election to monarchic rule by the Polish aristocracy in 1674. 

    Sobieski’s cultural background was characterized by Sarmatism – an all-encompassing worldview held by the Polish noble class, the origin of which was genealogically derived from the ancient Sarmatian people. This frame of mind found its most striking expression in clothing, which was based on oriental dress and which can be observed in certain portraits within the exhibition.  

    10

    Jerzy Eleuter Szymonowicz-Siemiginowski, Portrait of Queen Marie Casimire with her children, around 1684, Warsaw, Wilanow Palace Museum © Wojciech Holnicki

    A further section of the show is devoted to Sobieski’s role as a patron of the arts. ‘The monarch commissioned talented artists, who would later be employed under various European rulers. Among [these artists] was Martino Altomonte, who, after his time as a battlefield painter and portraitist for Sobieski, came to Vienna to create the frescoes for Prince Eugene in the Lower Belvedere. Austrian painting of the High Baroque would be unthinkable without Altomonte,’ according to Maike Hohn. Other important artist personalities who were also commissioned with furnishing the royal residence of Wilanów Palace were Jerzy Eleuter Szymonowicz-Siemiginowski and Jan Reisner, whose works are also on display in the exhibition. 

    Situated at the gates of Warsaw, Wilanów Palace can be described as the heart of Sobieski’s artistic patronage. Vincenzo Agostino Locci was entrusted with the architectural transformation of a simple country house into a Baroque regal estate. The exhibition presents important views of the palace captured in paintings by Bernardo Bellotto, which are works that have left their permanent home in the Canaletto Hall of the kingly residence in Warsaw specifically for this occasion.  

    9

    Daniel Schultz, Portrait of Johannes Hevelius, the astronomer, beer brewer and city council man of the old town of Gdansk, 1677 © Gdansk, Polish Acadelmy of Sciences, Gdansk Library.

    Not only did he promote the visual arts, Sobieski also showed interest in science and research. He supported scholars such as the Gdańsk astronomer Johannes Hevelius, an impression of whose character and scientific works is conveyed by exhibition. “Hevelius received an annual salary from Sobieski. For his work in breweries, the Polish king granted him a tax exemption. Sobieski also provided adequate funds for the reconstruction and re-equipping of the [astronomer’s] burned-out workshop,” says Konrad Pyzel. 

    Yet another portion of the exhibition focuses on Sobieski’s role as a husband and father. Letters kept to this day that were addressed to his wife, Marie Casimire, a French courtière in the Polish court, are testament to his deep affection and appreciation for his spouse and the political cooperation between the royal pair. A small selection of these letters can be viewed digitally, some of them for the first time in their English and German translations. Family portraits show the ruling couple and their children, who grew up in close contact with their parents at the court.  

    1

    Pierre Vaneau (Vanneau), John III, 1683/87, Nussbaumholz, Königschloss - Museum Warschau © Zamek Krolewski w Warsawie - Museum. Foto: Andrzej Ring, Lech Sandzewicz

    A dedicated chapter of the exhibition deals with the Battle of Vienna. After securing an alliance with Emperor Leopold I., Sobeiski went on to lead a battalion of allied troops as the supreme commander in the victory against the Ottomans. The forces under his charge consisted of imperial contingents, auxiliary troops from the Holy Roman Empire, and the Polish Crown Army. The contract illustrating this alliance with the emperor is of great importance to Austrian-Polish history. The exhibit shows central protagonists from both imperial and Polish sides of the joint enforcement. The closing point of this section of the exhibit is represented by objects associated with the Holy League and the 1699 Treaty of Karlowitz. 

    The penultimate section of the exhibition illuminates Sobieski’s return from Vienna, which was commemorated by royal trophies and precious textiles that he donated in part as votive gifts to churches and monasteries throughout Poland. 

     

    11

    François de Troy, Teresa Kunegunda Sobieska, around 1694, Lemberg, Borys Voznytsky National Art Gallery of Lviv © Lemberg, Borys Voznytsky National Art Gallery of Lviv

    The conclusion of the exhibition explores the glory afforded to the Polish king that immediately followed his successful liberation of Vienna. The memorial project for the Cathedral of Le Puy-en-Velay is one example of this gesture of recognition, away from European royal courts. At the behest of the bishop, monuments for Sobieski were erected in several churches around the French region of Auvergne. The sculptures in the exhibition make up part of a monument, which was ultimately never fully realized. 

    According to the director of the Wilanów Palace Museum, Paweł Jaskanis, ‘the exhibition brings together central works on a person, who can also be referred to as Momentum Sobescianum. The exhibition and its venue congenially complement one other. Prince Eugene of Savoy, the mastermind of the Winter Palace, would likely have met King Sobieski during the 1683 siege and liberation of Vienna.’

    2

    Exhibition view "John III Sobieski. A Polish King in Vienna". Photo: Sandro Zanziger © Belvedere, Vienna.

    3

    Exhibition view "John III Sobieski. A Polish King in Vienna". Photo: Sandro Zanziger © Belvedere, Vienna.

    4

    Exhibition view "John III Sobieski. A Polish King in Vienna". Photo: Sandro Zanziger © Belvedere, Vienna.

    5

    Exhibition view "John III Sobieski. A Polish King in Vienna". Photo: Sandro Zanziger © Belvedere, Vienna.

    6

    Exhibition view "John III Sobieski. A Polish King in Vienna". Photo: Sandro Zanziger © Belvedere, Vienna.


    0 0

    A fine and very rare iron-red ground blue and white dish, Jiajing six-character mark within double-circles and of the period (1522-1566)

    Lot 4064. A fine and very rare iron-red ground blue and white dish, Jiajing six-character mark within double-circles and of the period (1522-1566), 4 7/8 in. (12.5 cm.) diam. Estimate HKD 800,000 - HKD 1,200,000Price realised HKD 1,100,000 © Christie's Images Ltd 2012

    The small dish is of shallow form resting on a short foot. It is finely painted within the well in purplish-blue cobalt with two Buddhist lions either side of a central beribboned brocade ball with auspicious treasures, zabao scattered around the well contained within double-line borders encircling the well and rim. The reverse is similarly decorated with four further Buddhist lions. The decoration is reserved on a vibrant tomato-red ground, box.

    ProvenanceA Japanese private collection 

    NoteThe theme of gamboling Buddhist lions is frequently seen on late Ming ceramics but usually less finely rendered. Compare two slightly smaller dishes in the British Museum decorated with the same decorative motif but omitting the zabao, decorated in green enamel on an iron-red ground, illustrated by J. Harrison-Hall, Ming Ceramics, London, 2001, p. 256, nos. 9:95 and 9:96. Another single dish of the same pattern, also with green enamel on an iron-red ground in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco is illustrated by He Li, Chinese Ceramics. A New Comprehensive Survey, London, 1996, no. 457. The decoration on these three examples is much looser and less controlled than on the present dish.

    Porcelain dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566)

     Porcelain Lion dogs dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566), diam 15,5 cm, height 2,9 cm. Bequeathed by Henry J Oppenheim, 1947,0712.99 © 2017 Trustees of the British Museum

    Porcelain Lion dogs dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566)

    Porcelain Lion dogs dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566), diam 15,5 cm, height 2,9 cm. Donated by Sir Augustus Wollaston Franks, Franks.484.+ © 2017 Trustees of the British Museum

    Dish with lions, Ming dynasty (1368-1644), Reign of the Jiajing emperor (1522-1566)

    Dish with lions, Ming dynasty (1368-1644), Reign of the Jiajing emperor (1522-1566), China, Jiangxi province. White-glazed porcelain with overglaze enamel decoration. H. 1 1/8 in x Diam. 6 in, H. 2.9 cm x Diam. 15.2 cm. The Avery Brundage Collection, B60P2308 © 2017 Asian Art Museum Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture

    Although a lot of experimentation took place with different colour combinations during the Jiajing period, the visually very pleasing combination of underglaze blue and iron-red is surprisingly rare and few extant examples are recorded.

    Christie's. Important Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, 30 May 2012, Hong Kong, HKCEC Grand Hall


    0 0

    Porcelain dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566)

    2

    Porcelain Lion dogs dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566), diam 15,5 cm, height 2,9 cm. Bequeathed by Henry J Oppenheim, 1947,0712.99 © 2017 Trustees of the British Museum

    Potted along conventional lines, this dish has shallow rounded sides, a flared everted rim and a tapering foot. An unusual combination of colours makes it rather rare. Comical Buddhist lion-dogs, pursuing brocade balls, are reserved against an iron-red ground and painted in green enamel with black enamel outlines and details following the same technique as BM 1930.0719.48. Marked on the base with a six-character underglaze blue Jiajing reign mark arranged in two vertical rows of six characters. Overglaze iron-red enamel has a tendency to wear away, hence the bald patches on the object.

    Porcelain Lion dogs dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566)

    2

    Porcelain Lion dogs dish with green enamel reserved on a red ground, Ming dynasty, Jiajing mark and period (1522-1566), diam 15,5 cm, height 2,9 cm. Donated by Sir Augustus Wollaston Franks, Franks.484.+ © 2017 Trustees of the British Museum

    Potted along conventional lines, this dish has shallow rounded sides, a flared everted rim and a tapering foot. An unusual combination of colours makes it rather rare. Comical Buddhist lion-dogs, pursuing brocade balls, are reserved against an iron-red ground and painted in green enamel with black enamel outlines and details following the same technique as BM 1930.0719.48. Marked on the base with a six-character underglaze blue Jiajing reign mark arranged in two vertical rows of six characters, it has a badly chipped rim. Overglaze iron-red enamel has a tendency to wear away, hence the bald patches on the object.

    Note: The Chinese word for lion, 'shi zi', is probably derived from the Persian 'sir' and it was only through contact with the West that the Chinese became familiar with the animal. Images of lions became more widespread with the introduction of Buddhism to China in the Han dynasty. Mythical lions, 'shi zi', were believed to act as a talisman against demons. Yan Suihou wrote in the Tang dynasty that the lion 'not only delights the eye with its beauty, but it also protects us against demons even a thousand miles away'. Another dish of this type is in the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco. Harrison-Hall 2001 9:96.


    0 0

    Dish with lions, Ming dynasty (1368-1644), Reign of the Jiajing emperor (1522-1566)

    Dish with lions, Ming dynasty (1368-1644), Reign of the Jiajing emperor (1522-1566), China, Jiangxi province. White-glazed porcelain with overglaze enamel decoration. H. 1 1/8 in x Diam. 6 in, H. 2.9 cm x Diam. 15.2 cm. The Avery Brundage Collection, B60P2308 © 2017 Asian Art Museum Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture